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SAY OF THE DAY

SAY OF THE DAY

“You can’t ask customers what they want… By the time you get it built, they’ll want something new.” – Steve Jobs

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IN THE NEWS

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First line of network security is your staff.

 

4 Ways To Keep Your Website From Getting Hacked

Small businesses are especially vulnerable to hacking because they usually lack the technology expertise and site security that larger companies have. They also suffer more if their lack of expertise slows repairs and their ability to get back to work. Business owners can lose significant online traffic and sales if their site lands on blacklists operated by Google and other search engines.

Hackers are constantly breaking into innocent websites and using them to infect visitors with malware, lure them to dodgy sites and infiltrate databases to grab sensitive customer information. But you can avoid trouble — or eliminate it quickly — by taking some relatively simple steps.

Here’s how to get started:

1) Keep your software up to date.

Hackers aggressively target security flaws in popular Web software such as content management systems and blogging programs so they can attack websites en masse. Stay out of the line of fire by using the latest versions of software and applying security patches promptly.

2) Use strong passwords and keep them safe.

Using strong passwords is crucial because hackers frequently attempt to crack or steal passwords for web software and FTP servers, which are computers that use the File Transfer Protocol to move web pages and other files to another computer, such as a Web-hosting server. Default, common or predictable passwords can be easily broken.

3) Register with Google’s Webmaster Tools.

Getting on Google’s blacklist, which is used by the search site and the Chrome, Firefox and Safari browsers, can reduce traffic to your site. By registering with Webmaster Tools, you can receive notifications of malware infections immediately, sometimes before blacklisting occurs, so you can get rid of them faster. The service also provides details about the precise problem Google is seeing. That can speed your clean up and your return to Google’s good graces.

SAY OF THE DAY

4) Get expert help.

Companies that are heavily dependent on their websites may want to hire a firm that provides alerts if they get on a blacklist, monitoring for malicious activity, scanning for security vulnerabilities or help with repairs after a hack. Prices start at about $90 a year. Businesses that have databases with sensitive customer information connected to their sites should get help building security into their sites and scouring software code for bugs.

About 40Billion.com

40Billion is the social network of entrepreneurs and crowdfunders – a social platform for connecting business owners and promoting the things they create. Use 40Billion to find professional contacts and projects, get affordable business advertising and crowdfunding promotion, and show off your creations to the world.

 

6 Fundraising Tips Most Startup Entrepreneurs Don’t KnowIn reading the start-up and tech blogs these days, one would think investors are chomping at the bit to fund startups like yours. But as is true with most situations in life, you shouldn’t believe everything you read.

There are certainly examples of big and fast rounds and companies where money landed in a founder’s lap. But this isn’t the norm, nor should it be expected. Fundraising is hard, no matter what anyone tells you.

Here are some tips to make raising money for your business a little easier:

1) Time is not your friend.

Fundraising is in many respects a full time job, and the inertia of your company won’t take a vacation. Your customers, users, employees and everyone else involved will continue to require your attention even though you’re in the midst of a draining and consuming fundraising process. So the shorter this process takes the better. Moving fast and efficiently can also help stave off second thoughts among investors. Similar to a house that sits on the market, the longer a deal sits, the more questions and concerns are raised. Why didn’t XYZ fund do it? What have others seen that I’m not seeing?

2) Know who you want to work with.

Long before you’re ready to raise your round, think about the funds and people who you’d eventually like to work with. Begin to build relationships with these people and funds well before you need to ask them to participate. When it comes time to formally begin fundraising, the conversations will be much smoother and simpler since a previous relationship exists.

3) Stay in the driver’s seat.

Don’t start fundraising until you are ready. No matter who comes knocking or expresses interest, the process should be on your terms and when you’re ready.

4) Coordination is critical.

It’s vital to have answers to simple questions like how much you’re raising, why you’re raising it, how you plan to use capital, other players in the market, etc. Once the process moves forward into deeper diligence, you must make sure your business’ other stakeholders are aware of your fundraising effort. From customer calls and potential customer calls to tapping internal resources, you’ll need their cooperation to get things done.

5) The flow of information is absolute.

For better or for worse, you need to assume that once your deal is on the market, everyone knows about it. What you tell one partner or fund can quickly circulate across funds — and even coasts for that matter. If one firm passes on your deal, others will quickly find out. This isn’t to say that investors are conspiring against entrepreneurs — that’s certainly not the case, however, people talk and you need to know that.

6) Deadlines are a must, but flexibility is key.

If given the opportunity, many investors will take more time. Time means results, data points and additional proof points by which to make an investment decision. So you need to build in that urgency to keep the process moving forward. Find a meaningful event that will drive the firms involved towards a decision and, ideally, a term sheet. Still, if you have an investor or firm that you really love and they need a bit more time to get their partnership or work in order, don’t hesitate to honor that request. Nothing replaces a great long-term partner.

 

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Are we doing enough to support small business growth?

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Are we doing enough to support small business growth?

Brad Rosser, Non-Executive Chairman, Xref, does not believe the UK Government has a well-orchestrated plan for ongoing small business support.

  • By Brad Rosser

        

bb

Pick up a batch of today’s newspapers and you’ll see divided opinions on the state and future health of UK plc like we’ve never experienced before.

Personally, I think the views of the 100 leading economists who took part in the latest Financial Times annual predictions survey bear the most weight. They project growth to slow further still, to around 1.5 per cent in 2018, with business investment to remain on hold, interest rates to nudge up and consumers to curb spending as the uncertainty of Brexit continues to loom large.

But, whatever opinion you choose to trust, it’s fair to say it’s hardly the ideal environment for start-ups to prosper and hatch into high growth businesses.

What Support Network Does the UK Provide?

Although the UK scores high in the OECD global ranking for number of start-ups created, it sits outside the top ten when it comes to fostering businesses that grow into established, medium-sized companies.

This should be a red flag to any Government. It’s essential for a country’s start-up scene to be successful, given these companies represent a critical component of short-term economic success and will ultimately form the future business ecosystem.

The UK Government has tried to implement a network of support services, such as the British Business Bank – to bring expertise and money to the smaller business finance markets; Innovate UK – to drive growth by supporting new business innovation; and Growth Accelerator – to support SMEs in accessing finance and commercialising innovation.

The Enterprise Investment Scheme (EIS) and Seed Enterprise Investment Scheme (SEIS) have also provided a vehicle for funding for thousands of businesses from individuals able to invest generously due to the tax breaks offered in return for the investments. This incentive could easily be opened up to investment organisations too, but at the moment it looks more likely the tax breaks will be pegged back, if anything.

Are we doing enough to support small business growth?

International Inspiration

Ultimately, there’s some merit in all of these initiatives, but I don’t believe the UK Government has a well-orchestrated plan for ongoing small business support.

It could take some inspiration from similar economies overseas. Take Australia, for example – it has recognised the value in small business success and established a model for driving the growth of the sector, with an ecosystem of initiatives dedicated to supporting new businesses as they grow. The Single Business Service, for example, provides businesses with direct access to a dedicated individual point of contact for information and referral services in their early days.

Innovation is also encouraged by the Australian Government, with resources such as the Entrepreneurs’ Program, a flagship initiative for competitiveness and productivity of individual businesses, that forms part of the National Innovation and Science Agenda, as well as AusIndustry, a division of the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science, which provides access to information and support to enable business owners to:

  • Get a business up and running
  • Develop and commercialise ideas and products
  • Improve, innovate and grow a business
  • Reach new markets

Need-to-Have vs Nice-to-Have

As a business builder and entrepreneur myself, I’ve worked with some of the world’s largest and most ambitious blue chip companies at board level, while with McKinsey and Co. I also worked directly for Sir Richard Branson as Director of Corporate Development at Virgin – helping to identify and scale start-ups like Virgin Direct and Virgin Active. As a result, I know there is one type of business that fairs better in a challenging economy. The ‘need-to-have’ business.

When times are tough, people have a propensity to spend on what they need, rather than the nice-to-haves. Those businesses in the ‘need-to-have’ bracket should focus on the products and services that save people money, time and effort to gain traction and growth.

The tech sector is leading the way in this respect. Naysayers believe tech and robots (and the automation they offer) are going to hinder not help the economy in the next decade.

I don’t agree. Given my current role at Xref, I can see firsthand the impact automation will have on the HR and recruitment industries, which are specifically earmarked for significant change. But, this is positive disruption.

Overcoming Economic Challenges with Tech Ingenuity

The founders of Xref launched and grew the business for its first five years on their own funding. As a start-up in Australia back in 2009, its success came from the fact that it offered an efficient, tech-based solution to a real problem present in every hiring decision made at every organisation – the inefficiency, inconsistency and unreliability of manual reference checking methods. The opportunity was vast, the technology was smart and the end user experience was simple and insightful.

Now, the Xref platform also includes an advanced AI-fueled algorithm to recognise positive, neutral and negative sentiment, and interprets the referee’s ‘tone of voice’ for the employer.

The AI-driven tool is already delivering 92% to 98% accuracy, which ensures a far greater chance of an accurate reading every time than could ever be guaranteed by a human-driven approach.

That’s a compelling product in any economic climate.

Are we doing enough to support small business growth?

Key Pillars for Growth

Having listed on the ASX in 2016, Xref is now a global business with operations in the USA, Canada, APAC and EMEA, and a 700-strong client portfolio including the likes of Snap Inc. (Snapchat), Coca Cola Amatil and Nike.

My advice to businesses at a point of high-growth opportunity as seen by Xref in 2016, is:

  • As your company grows, start expanding into new regions, but start on a low budget. You will have done your due-diligence as to the market opportunity, but minimise your risk
  • Give the regional teams that you put in place an initial target of breaking even – there’s little point in setting up your team to ‘fail’ by setting targets that are unachievable in the short term.
  • Set up the new offices as a sales and marketing operation – your new business pipeline should always be filled with prospects – and put as many locals as you can into those offices
  • As soon as you can afford to, recruit an established senior figure from the industry to bring their network and experience

Ultimately, good ideas that help to overcome real problems will achieve growth in any economic climate. But, the rate and scope of their success will, at some stage, be reliant on the market they’re founded in and its support and encouragement for small businesses.

Making this possible is not only good for individual business growth, but for the global reputation of a country and the value its businesses can offer.

See my comments on this.

 

Four Dangerous Traps Online Marketers Must Avoid

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by Mateusz Sobieraj  |  With Compliments of Marketing Profs and excellent source of professional Marketing Content. Join them today. – NO I am not an affiliate but a very happy 14 year user of their products as a Premium and Free Member.

The abundance of new technologies and powerful opportunities in marketing can get overwhelming for a marketer. How in the world could you not feel lost in the jungle of solutions at your disposal? And if you use an agency, how can you know that it’s truly benefiting your company?

Having conducted or supervised more than 900 digital campaigns, I’ve come across several dangerous traps that are initially hard to spot. This article will point out the four most common.

1. Don’t let the CTR deceive you https://www.mjfgroup.biz/4dangerousonlinetrapsmarketersmustavoid

One of the most frequently used indicators of the effectiveness of online advertising is the clickthrough rate (CTR), the ratio of the number of clicks on an ad to the number of views.

Imagine attractive advertising formats, beautiful graphics, and strong CTAs encouraging taking action. A customer clicks on the ad and lands on a website. But there’s a problem: The page is not consistent with the creative’s visual design, or the user is flooded with all kinds of information instead of with the information promised in the ad. The result: the visitor abandons the website, and the campaign results end up being far from satisfactory.

Tip: It is important to focus not only on the aesthetics of the ad’s design but also on the communication and promise we use to tempt the user to enter into an interaction.

But what if I told you that sometimes a decrease in CTR is a good sign?

Consider a campaign for a financial-sector client. CTR, conversion rate, and number and cost of leads acquired through contact forms were all at very good levels. We analyzed the effectiveness of the campaign from start until the end of the conversion path—i. e., granting a loan. At the validation stage, it turned out that although quantitatively speaking it all looked great—lots of people applying—but a large proportion of loan applicants were ineligible and their applications had to be rejected.

So we tightened up the targeting of our advertisements, adding additional messages to exclude ineligible people up front. As a result, the ads were even less aesthetically appealing, but a clearer and more on-point message was created, and so people who were clicking on the ad were much more informed about what to expect. CTRs and the number of leads fell sharply, but lead quality improved several-fold.

Four Dangerous Traps Online Marketers Must Avoid

The value of the CTR can also be overestimated because of the ad format being used:

  • Mobile ads often cover a large portion of the available screen area or they’re otherwise placed in such a way that you can easily click them by accident. Therefore, they tend to have higher CTR than desktop advertising, but the traffic they bring is of terrible quality because they resulted from random clicks.
  • Intrusive formats, such as top layer, interstitials, interscrollers, open over a page and overshadow the entire page or large parts of it. A large proportion of clicks on those ads is, again, random, making CRTs huge—but the quality of the traffic poor.Tip: Check whether the publisher’s package includes various formats, say double billboard, billboard, and rectangle—but there is also a layer format between those, for example scroll double billboard or top layer. Even though thanks to that approach the cost per click will be lower than it would be without the layer format, most of the advertising might be run (and often is) on this layer format. And that makes the quality of the campaign dubious, to put it mildly.
  • Screenings are a format composed of one of the banner forms, for example double billboard, and connected to the website’s entire background. It may be a large, visible form of advertising, but sometimes the sides of the websites’ wallpaper are black or in the color of the site’s usual background, so they no longer look like an advertisement and yet they are still clickable! That generates a huge number of clicks, but, again, lots of them are accidental.

2. Don’t let details divert your attention from the real results

Very often, when analyzing the results of an online campaign we focus on a small portion of the available data and on conclusions drawn directly from an advertising campaign, but the true picture is much broader and more informative.

Conversions

Conversions—the key actions that users take on the website—are divided into two categories: macro, which are the most important ones, such as the purchase of a product; and micro, which help you to determine the quality of your traffic (e. g., whether they download the brochure or subscribe to the newsletter).

It’s worth checking out different models of conversion attribution and analyzing what roles various traffic sources play in the entire buying process.

For sales analysis, if the product is distributed by various sources, it might be the distributors that feel the effects of the campaign rather than the manufacturer selling via its stores or other owned channels.

An example: The promoted product’s pre-sales in the producer’s online store and the accompanying campaign achieved excellent results. When the product arrives at other distributors with a price lower by only a small percentage, sales in the producer’s shop fell, and continued to fall, within 1-2 days. Media indicators and traffic quality remained at high levels, but conversions decreased. Tools for analyzing users’ behavior on the website confirmed that users are copying the name of the product then searching for it in Google and price-comparison engines—and going on to make purchases elsewhere. Ultimately, the producer was delighted with the global sales volume. But, for example, if the product had been available from the very start in many stores and a little cheaper than in the manufacturer’s shop, without looking at the total sales data the campaign would certainly have been considered ineffective.

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Four Dangerous Traps Online Marketers Must Avoid

Acquisition

Sometimes, the cost of obtaining the first order from a customer is much higher than the profit the initial sale generates. It is easy to fall under the illusion that an advertising campaign was unprofitable by analyzing its return on investment only through the prism of the first orders directly from the campaign. But if you also take into account rates of customer retention and maintenance, and customer lifetime value, then your results can suddenly become very attractive, proving that the campaign will pay for itself many times over.

Example: The client, a Polish travel agency, offers exotic tours to destinations such as Seychelles, Maldives, and Mauritius. The costs of acquiring traffic on its website and of getting an enquiry were very high and very often did not immediately pay for themselves. But that is just part of the story. One of the clients ordered a trip to Maldives worth 28,000 PLN (about $8,000). She was satisfied after her return and almost immediately planned another two trips with the same travel bureau, as well as recommending it to another three couples who were friends of hers. Two of those couples also decided to travel. The result: one customer generated more than $30,000 worth of trips sold.

A similar situation occurs in e-commerce. Subsequent visits and orders, purchases of accessories for already bought products, repeat purchases… all determine the eventual profit from an initial investment in advertising.

Other Considerations

During and after larger campaigns, we notice an increased number of searches in Google, and consequently a larger number of visitors from direct and organic. The following graph shows the increase of visits from organic right from the start of the campaign. Apart from that, there were no activities in other media or increased SEO spending. In short, paid also increases organic traffic.

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It is also worth measuring how much information about your brand and products spreads organically in forums, social media, and the Internet in general—whether there are more references to the brand, where, in what context, and whether users are starting to recommend the product themselves.

Four Dangerous Traps Online Marketers Must Avoid

3. Don’t get flattened by the flat fee

Flat fee (FF) billing seems like a permanent presence. It refers to paying publisher a fixed rate for the advertising space: For example, we order a week of our advertisement on the homepage of the website.

What traps here could you fall into?

Pay attention to the following:

  • Statistics. Always request them beforehand. The publisher should provide you with information about the number of pageviews (PV) and the number of unique users (UU). This way, you know what to expect in return for a fixed fee—how many times your advertisement will be displayed and how many users you will reach. The data is from the previous period, but it will be similar to the current one.
  • Relevant statistics. When you receive the statistics, make sure that they (a) refer to the period for which you order your ad (so you don’t get a monthly data for a one-week ad), and (b) refer to the particular subpage where you order advertising, not the entire website.
  • Rotation. This is something that’s sometimes not mentioned, but it’s essential to clarify. You need to know whether your ad will be broadcast exclusively in a given time—rotation; for example, you order a week of advertising presence on the site, but you’ll be one of four advertisers, so only one in four views will be yours. There’s nothing wrong with that, provided you have this information beforehand and account for it in your estimates.

Tip: It may be difficult to judge at first glance where to place an advertisement. To decide, you need to compare the available data all in one table. It should include information about the publishers, the users’ profiles, and the relation between usage stats and rates. The table will help you calculate the expected cost of reaching 1000 unique users or the cost of generating 1000 views.

For this purpose, divide the net value by PV (pageviews) or UU (unique users), and multiply by 1,000 to get the CPM (cost per thousand) views or users.

https://www.mjfgroup.biz/FourDangerousTrapsOnlineMarketersMustAvoid

4. Watch out for confusing data

The amount of data, especially in programmatic ad buying, is so large today, that it is quite a chore to choose the data worth our attention and our money.

Programmatic gives you great opportunities to target your advertising, including the following:

  • Retargeting people who had contact with the advertisement but were not yet on your website, or even better, arranging for these people an entire sequence of displays of various forms of ads and messages
  • Syncing with TV ads
  • Purchasing DOOH (digital out of home) ads, which are displayed on screens in shops, galleries, etc.
  • Directing advertising to people within a 100-meter radius of a given point on the map
  • Access to multiple providers of various kinds of user data based on demographics, online behavior, pages visited, advertisements clicked, interests, shopping intentions, etc.

Four Dangerous Traps Online Marketers Must Avoid

How do you choose the right data for your campaign?

You have to pay attention to who the data provider is and what kind of data it provides: What kind of company, whether local or international, and if the latter, does it have valuable data from your market?

Also check where and how the data is collected. Unfortunately, that information might be not so easy to obtain, but it is still worth doing research. Try asking the DSP (demand-side platform) or the data providers directly.

Another important criterion is, of course, price. You have to find a balance here: Check whether any additional few dollars per CPM will pay off through an increase in conversion rates or higher quality of traffic on the website.

Tip: The final criterion for verifying the quality and usefulness of data in your campaign is a test campaign! It’s best to carry out several test runs: Try purchasing data with a similar profile, but from different suppliers, and then select the one with data that’s most suitable and most cost-effective.

What impact can data selection have on the campaign?

Here is an example illustrating campaigns run for one of our customers—the same DSP platform, the same creatives used, and identical rates. Changing the data used in the campaign itself resulted in an enormous improvement in all the indicators that show the quality of traffic:

https://www.mjfgroup.biz/FourDangerousTrapsOnlineMarketersMustAvoid

* * *

They say the devil is in the details, and that holds true especially for online campaigns. Seemingly effective solutions may prove to be ineffective in reality because superficially evaluated indicators can give you a false impression.

Before running your ad, make sure you fully understand how it will be displayed, and afterward take a look at the effects it had from various perspectives. Only when will you see what real impact it had—what it did and didn’t achieve—and why.

 

Comment.

I have been studying with Shaw Academy. Ultimate Digital Marketing Diploma. In my last week I am sure.

Caitlin Hogg is the lecturer and she is Excellent.

I encourage anyone interested in Digital Marketing to go to Shaw Academy and see what they offer. You will be surprised.

Contact me for talking about our Xtreme Business program that can boost profitable sales by up to 179% in a single year.

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The MJF Group works with Ceo’s/MD’s/Owners of declining business bringing them back from the brink.

 

 

 

 

Don’t let your business sink.

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Eight tell tale signs of a declining business.  

https://www.interco.mjfgroup.biz/Eight tell tale signs of a declining business.

Check out these Eight tell tale signs of a declining business.

If you’re still uncertain that Your business is in serious trouble, then pay attention to the following Eight telltale signs of a declining business

1. Low sales.

The first, and most obvious, sign that your business is sinking is low sales. This could either be lower than expected projections or a decrease in sales than the previous quarter. Your business can’t succeed without a steady income to pay all of your expenses.

https://www.interco.mjfgroup.biz/Eight tell tale signs of a declining business.

When you notice that there’s a sudden decrease in sales, you need to diagnose the problem. Begin by surveying your employees and customers, conducting a competitive analysis and examining the outside environment, like societal changes or natural disasters. 

This should give you a better understanding of why there’s a decline in sales and if there will be a turnaround. If it doesn’t seem likely the industry or your business can turn things around, then it’s rather clear that your business is in trouble so make sure you check ut the rest of the Eight tell tale signs of a declining business.

2. You can’t remember the last time you spoke to a client.

Customer service reps aren’t the only ones talking to your customers. Even as a founder and CEO, it’s your responsibility to talk to your potential or existing customers to understand their needs and how to improve your business. It’s a trick that everyone from Sam Walton to Slack’s Stewart Butterfield have relied on.

It’s another troubling sign for your business if you can’t remember the last time that you spoke to a customer. Either you’re not actively engaging them or they just don’t have an interest in your products or services anymore.

Eight tell tale signs of a declining business.

3. No one is talking about your business.

This almost goes hand-in-hand with the previous point. Something is wrong if no one is mentioning you on social media, leaving reviews or getting in touch with customer service reps. It’s either because you’re not interacting with your audience or they simply don’t care about your business.

Make an effort to reach out to your customers by asking them to leave reviews and boosting your engagement on social media. If there’s still silence, then that might not be enough to save your business. I personally blog about whatever it is that is trending, a lot, to attract people to my company. It helps!

Eight tell tale signs of a declining business.

4. You regularly question your motives.

We all have moments where we ask questions like “Why am I doing this?” or blurting out statements like “I can’t take this anymore.” That’s normal during the entrepreneurial journey. However, if that mentality is becoming more and more frequent than it’s time to move on from your business.

Eight telltale signs of a declining business.

5. There’s nothing unique about your business.

Your business needs to stand-out from your competitors. Take a moment and jot down all of the characteristics of your business, products and services, then compare it with the others within your industry. If you’re different from your top competitors, then you have a competitive edge you can use to your advantage.

https://www.interco.mjfgroup.biz/Eight tell tale signs of a declining business.

If not, you can be certain that your business won’t stand the test of time. Either find something that makes you unique or, find an industry where you can differentiate yourself.

6. Complacency.

Blockbuster is the poster child for business failures in recent history. The main reason that the company went kaput was it failed to acknowledge that its customers wanted something different. Instead of driving to their local Blockbuster and paying hefty late fees, people enjoyed having Netflix deliver or stream movies. Reportedly, Netflix executives offered a partnership with Blockbuster around 2000 but were laughed out of the office by Blockbuster execs.

In short, complacency was Blockbuster’s demise.

If you’re sitting there wondering why your business is in danger, ask yourself when was the last time that your business introduced something new into the market?

7. Employee turnover and hiring turnovers.

Sometimes your employees realize that there’s a problem before you do. Whether it’s as obvious as not getting paid, or subtler like no longer believing in your business or frustration with management, you need to get to the root cause of high employee turnover.

It costs more money to hire and train new employees than to retain the employees that you currently have. Things can get real tricky when you don’t have the budget to replace those employees. That means that you’re expecting your already frustrated and overworked staff to do more work for you. How much longer do you think they’ll put up with that? It’s a vicious cycle that can ultimately bury your business. So don’t ignore the  Eight tell tale signs of a declining business.

 

8. There are serious cash flow struggles.

Cash flow is the money that is coming in and out of your business. It’s generally accepted that if you want your business to survive it has to have a positive cash flow, which means that you’re bringing in enough money to manage all of your expenses.

If you’re having cash flow problems due to debts, poor bookkeeping, growing too quickly, and not accurately forecasting your future earning and spending, then there’s one of the most obvious warning signs that your company is going under. If not correctly dealt with, don’t expect to keep your business open very much longer. So ensure that you take the Eight tell tale signs of a declining business to heart. We can help.

Eight tell tale signs of a declining business.

Don’t let your business sink beneath the waves due to the Eight tell tale signs of a declining business. ..https://www.interco.mjfgroup.biz/Eight tell tale signs of a declining business.

So if this is where you are heading you will need a complete makeover. Starting with Marketing and then……

Eight tell tale signs of a declining business.

Contact us for a free one-hour consultation let us tell you how we have helped hundreds of business like yours on 3 continents.

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Dr Freestone began training professionally in April 2004 after a very long and diversified career with Anglo American and its associated companies, during which he wrote his proprietary range of 97 business and soft skill courses. He named the copyright company BASS, which stands for Business and Soft Skills, in remembrance of his Dad, Ray, who was an expert BASS fisherman. Doc, as he is commonly called, managed both small business in the £1 million to £79 million range and large-scale multinational…

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